Traffic

  • How do I get an all way stop installed at an intersection in my neighbourhood?

    The purpose of a stop sign is to control the right of way at an intersection. All way stop controls are installed at the intersection of two relatively equal roadways, having similar traffic volume demand and operating characteristics or in response to high collision rates, excessive vehicular delay, and a high rate of pedestrian crossings at the intersection.Many individuals believe that the installation of stop signs will lower the speed at which vehicles travel on a particular street. This in untrue, and may result in higher speeds between stop signs, as drivers accelerate to make up the lost time for having to stop. Stop signs are only effective at slowing traffic within a short distance of the intersection.Improper use of all way stop controls unnecessarily restricts traffic flow. At unwarranted locations, drivers who do not expect cross traffic often fail to stop completely at the intersection, which negatively affects pedestrian safety.All requests should be directed, in writing, to the Transportation Services Department at the City of Niagara Falls, c/o MacBain Community Centre, 7150 Montrose Road, Unit #1, Niagara Falls, Ontario, L2H 3N3.Categories: Traffic

  • How do I obtain permission from the City to host my event that requires the use or closure of a City road or sidewalk?

    Special Event permits are issued by the City to grant permission to occupy City streets and sidewalks for special events such as parades and walk-a-thons. Please complete a Special Events Permit Application and send it with your completed insurance certificate to the Transportation Services Department at the City of Niagara Falls, c/o MacBain Community Centre, 7150 Montrose Road, Unit #1, Niagara Falls, Ontario, L2H 3N3.As some special events may require City Council approval, you should submit your proposal at least two months prior to the event date. The applicant is responsible for any costs associated with the event and must have liability insurance coverage.Categories: Traffic

  • How do I obtain traffic volumes for the stretch of road in front of my business?

    The City maintains a yearly count program and can provide turning movement count data for all signalized intersections, and link volume counts for all arterial and major collector type roadways. Traffic count data can be obtained by contacting the City's Transportation Services Department at 905 356-7521 extension 5200.The cost of each intersection turning movement count is $200.00 plus HST, while midblock counts are $75.00 plus HST.Categories: Traffic

  • How do I request the installation of a school crossing guard in my neighbourhood?

    School crossing guards are adults who assist school aged children in crossing the street. When approaching a school crossing, all vehicles are required to come to a complete stop and remain stopped until the children and school crossing guard are safely off the road.School crossing guard locations are determined by staff based on volume and gap studies. Provincial guidelines do not recommend the installation of crossing guards at signalized intersections or all-way stops.All requests for school crossing guards should be brought forth to your school's principal, who should then formally request the City to investigate. The principal should submit in writing a letter to the Transportation Services Department at the City of Niagara Falls, c/o MacBain Community Centre, 7150 Montrose Road, Unit #1, Niagara Falls, Ontario, L2H 3N3.Categories: Traffic

  • I want the on street parking layout on my street changed, what should I do?

    As parking is a contentious issue in most neighbourhoods, the City requests that a letter be mailed to the Transportation Services Department detailing the problem and suggested solutions to the problem. Once a request has been received, City Staff will review the area and determine if parking restrictions are required in order to address a "technical" problem. If a technical problem if found, a survey may be distributed to all affected residents of any requested parking changes in order to solicit an unbiased representation of the need / want for parking changes.All requests should be directed, in writing, to the Transportation Services Department at the City of Niagara Falls, c/o MacBain Community Centre, 7150 Montrose Road, Unit #1, Niagara Falls, Ontario, L2H 3N3.Categories: Traffic

  • What is the speed limit on my street?

    Speed limits are determined largely by roadway geometry and surrounding land uses. Under the Highway Traffic Act, the speed limit within a city, town or built up area is 50 km/h, unless otherwise posted by the municipality. On roads that do not have speed limit signs, the speed limit is 50 km/h.Categories: Traffic

  • What should I do about the vehicles that speed on my street?

    Residents concerned with speed are encouraged to participate in the City's Neighbourhood Speed Watch program. The Neighbourhood "Speed Watch" Program is a safety awareness program intended to give motorists a friendly reminder of their speed when travelling through your neighbourhood. Often, drivers who speed in residential areas are unaware of the effect their actions have on the peace and safety of you and your neighbours. The radar board displays the actual speed of the passing car (whether it is speeding or not) and helps the specific violator become aware of their excessive speed and lets them learn from the experience, without the consequence of a fine.The City has a policy for implementing speed control plans through the use of speed humps and traffic circles. These are physical devices which force drivers to slow down as they maneuver over or around the obstacle. If you feel that there is a speeding problem on your street, please submit a request, in writing, to the Transportation Services Department at the City of Niagara Falls, c/o MacBain Community Centre, 7150 Montrose Road, Unit #1, Niagara Falls, Ontario, L2H 3N3. Once we receive your request, Staff will schedule speed studies to determine the operating speed of your street. As part of the review we will also review the collision history, traffic volume counts, pedestrian activity, visibility assessment and a signing review. Should the data indicate that there is a speeding problem, City Staff will follow up with a questionnaire to determine the neighbourhood's preference for speed control devices.Categories: Traffic

  • Who do I contact about an object (e.g., a large tree) that is causing a sight restriction at an intersection in my neighbourhood, making it difficult to see on coming traffic?

    Objects located within an intersection=s daylighting triangle (i.e., shrubs or trees) can obstruct sight lines. Please contact the Transportation Services Department at 905 356-7521 extension 5200 to report these concerns. City staff will undertake a field investigation and determine what action should be taken to clear up the sight lines at the intersection.Categories: Traffic

  • Who do I contact to request the installation of a new traffic sign or move an existing traffic sign on my street or report an obstructed/missing traffic sign?

    Requests for all new or relocated traffic signs must be approved by the Transportation Services Department prior to any work being undertaken. If you would like to request a new traffic sign or have an existing traffic sign relocated, please direct your request, in writing, to the Transportation Services Department at the City of Niagara Falls, c/o MacBain Community Centre, 7150 Montrose Road, Unit #1, Niagara Falls, Ontario, L2H 3N3.Obstructed, missing, faded or vandalized traffic signs should be reported to our Municipal Service Centre at 905 356-1355.Categories: Traffic

  • Who should I contact to report a broken or malfunctioning traffic signal?

    The City's traffic control signals are maintained by the Region of Niagara. Please call the Region=s emergency contact number at 905 685 1571 to report any malfunctions. The following are different situations and what to do in the event of a failure:

    • Flashing Amber: Proceed through the intersection with caution
    • Flashing Red: Treat the intersection as a four way stop
    • Power Failure: Treat the intersection as a four way stop
    Categories: Traffic

  • Why is the "Walking Person" light not long enough to cross the street before the "Flashing Hand" is displayed?

    There is a common misunderstanding that the "Walking Person" should be displayed for the time required to cross a street. The purpose of the "Walking Person" light is to inform pedestrians when it is safe to cross the street. The pedestrian protection does not end when the "Flashing Hand" begins to flash. The "Flashing Hand" informs that pedestrians on the curb should not begin to cross the street. If you have already started crossing when the "Flashing Hand" is displayed, continue crossing, as sufficient time has been provided for you to clear the crosswalk.Categories: Traffic